Cycling is as efficient as walking

Cycling

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Bicycle helps premenopausal women gain less weight, study revealed

Cycling is particularly good for keeping pounds away from those women who are already overweight or obese, says Anne C. Lusk, an associate researcher in the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Nutrition in Boston, United States.

Bicycle for premenopausal women gain

“Women of normal weight can certainly benefit from this exercise,” he says. “But specifically for premenopausal women who are overweight or obese, riding a bicycle for only two or three hours a week makes them 46 percent less likely to gain 5 percent of their initial weight.”

The team led by Anne also found that walking slowly – less than five miles in an hour – does not help control weight. She and her colleagues reported the findings of their study in June in the “Archives of Internal Medicine.”

Authors

The authors noted that in 1995, the American Center for Disease Control and Prevention of the American College of Sports Medicine recommended that all American adults spend half an hour of moderate or intense exercise per day. However, despite the warning, two-thirds of this population is overweight or obese while 16% of American children and adolescents are overweight and one-third is on the verge of overweight. What are the Kids On- Purchase advice for children’s bicycles?

In a recent survey, the study team reported that walking quickly helped women who were either normal weight or recently lost weight and wanted to keep the pounds further apart while walking slowly showed no benefit.

The researchers decided to explore the beneficial potential that could be achieved if more women were to insert the bike into their routine. Only half of the total 1% of Americans over the age of 16 who go to work uses a bicycle. Of this group, only 23% are women, according to the author and best bike us.

The authors looked at the medical history, parental weight, exercise habits, and other lifestyle information of more than 18,400 women who participated in the “Second Nurses’ Health Study.” Women were between 25 and 42 years old in 1989 and therefore were premenopausal in 2005 and had no physical impediments to exercise.

Lusk’s team focused the research on weight change that occurred in the 16 years. In 1989, about half of the women said they walked slowly, while 40 percent said they were walking quickly and almost half said they were riding a bicycle.

Women

In 2005, women gained around nine pounds, while the total time they spent actively declined significantly. However, women who did not ride a bicycle in 1989 but did so in 2005 experienced a significant reduction in weight gain at that time. The statement was verified mainly among overweight women, for whom cycling at least five minutes a day made a difference. And the more they rode their bikes, the less weight they gained, and the authors noted.

In contrast, those who decreased their bike time over the years, from 15 minutes a day to less or nothing had a great gain in weight. And normal-weight women who rode bicycles for more than four hours a week in 2005 have reduced the likelihood of gaining more than 5 percent of their weight, researchers say.

The team concluded that riding a bicycle, as well as walking fast, should be encouraged for premenopausal women, particularly if they are dealing with weight gain.

“We are advocating a physical activity that is part of everyday life,” Lusk says. “You do not have to think about your heart rate, how much time per week you do. We are recommending that the woman include the bike or a brisk walk seven days a week. ”

Cedric X. Bryant, head of science at the American Council of Exercise in San Diego, said the recommendations hit the mark. “Their arguments fit the need to help Americans program physical activity into their lifestyles,” he says.

Cycling not impact

“Cycling has no impact, so it’s comfortable for joints, making this activity more accessible to several people, whom I think all the most important fitness organizations are heading,” says Bryant.

However, Niece Goldberg, medical director of the women’s heart program at New York University Medical Center, issued a warning note reminding women how to interpret this new information and details the best bike us.

“I think underestimating the benefits of walking at a slow pace is a bad message to send to people, who can spend most of their lives sitting in a chair,” he says. “Because walking slowly is a good start if you still do not exercise. It is cheaper than the BMX bike and can be easier. Basically, you can start anywhere.”

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